What are your current fitness goals?

Have you thought about your current fitness goals lately or simply need to reassess them?

If you need help, I’m available to get you on the right track – Contact me today on 021 865 478 or email dave@workoutunleashed.com

Can’t get to me to train one-on-one?

ONLINE Training means you get all my knowledge, expertise and motivation without even having to see me face to face.

Whether you would like to train from home or maybe have current gym membership, but want to maximise your time, then online training could be perfect for you.

 

Are you getting enough Magnesium in your diet?

Magnesium is vital for your body to function properly.

Recommended daily intake:

  • From 1 to 3 years of age: 80 mg a day
  • From 4 to 8 years: 130 mg a day
  • from 9 to 13 years: 240 mg a day

From 14 years, the requirements are different for men and women.

  • Males aged 14 to 18 years: 410 mg a day
  • Males aged 19 years and over: 400 to 420 mg a day
  • Females aged 14 to 18 years: 360 mg a day
  • Females aged 19 years and over: 310 to 320 mg a day
  • During pregnancy: 350 to 400 mg a day
  • During breast feeding: 310 to 360 mg a day

Sources

The best sources of magnesium are nuts and seeds, dark green vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. Magnesium is also added to some breakfast cereals and other fortified foods.

Here are some good sources of magnesium:

  • Sunflower seeds, dry roasted, 1 cup: 512 mg
  • Almonds, dry-roasted, 1 cup: 420 mg
  • Sesame seeds, roasted whole, 1 ounce: 101 mg
  • Spinach, boiled, 1 cup: 78 mg
  • Cashews, dry-roasted, 1 ounce: 74 mg
  • Shredded wheat cereal, two large biscuits: 61 mg
  • Soymilk, plain, 1 cup: 61 mg
  • Black beans, cooked, 1 cup: 120 mg
  • Oatmeal, cooked, 1 cup: 58 mg
  • Broccoli, cooked, 1 cup: 51 mg
  • Edamame, shelled, cooked, 1 cup: 100 mg
  • Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons: 49 mg
  • Shrimp, raw, 4 ounces: 48 mg
  • Black-eyed peas, cooked, 1 cup: 92 mg
  • Brown rice, cooked, 1 cup: 84 mg
  • Kidney beans, canned, 1 cup: 70 mg
  • Cow’s milk, whole, 1 cup: 33 mg
  • Banana, one medium: 33 mg
  • Bread, whole-wheat, one slice: 23 mg

Magnesium is lost as wheat is refined, so it is best to choose cereals and bread products made with whole grains. Most common fruits, meat, and fish, are low in magnesium.

Risks

An overdose of magnesium through dietary sources is unlikely, because any excess magnesium that is consumed in food will be eliminated in the urine.

However, a high intake of magnesium from supplements can lead to gastrointestinal problems, such as diarrhea, nausea, and cramping.

Very large doses can cause kidney problems, low blood pressure, urine retention, nausea and vomiting, depression and lethargy, a loss of central nervous system control, cardiac arrest, and possibly death.

Anyone with a kidney disorder should not take magnesium supplements, unless their doctor advises it.

Magnesium supplementation may also give rise to some drug interactions.

B&%LS#@T !!!

B&%LS#@T !!!

If anyone has ever told you that getting in shape is easy…they were talking a whole bunch of B&%SH#@T !!!

To make the changes you want, you need to work hard, real hard! Your body likes to sit at its current set-point, to move it from there you have to shock your system into making change.

In my opinion you need to take your body near to its extremes (almost) every time you train. Here’s my reasoning.

  • When you do an intense training session, you will force your body to use a huge amount of resource to return you to a steady state, this can result in a post-exercise metabolic boost for 4 to 6 hours after you workout.
  • Often training hard means you can’t train as long. Time-efficient can relate to time-effective.
  • You make yourself mentally strong. You get better at handling a higher work rate, the pain, the discomfort… all of this resets your mind-set for future hard-out sessions.

So get out there, work hard and get results!